Using A Fish-Eye As A Wide-Angle


fish


dominantThe secret to using a full-frame or circular fisheye lens most effectively is to employ it when there is symmetry.  The distortion then works in your favour, creating a pleasing impression on the viewer, as seen above and below.



However, a full-frame fisheye can also be used as a super-wide angle lens if a certain technique is followed: keeping a horizon line or a horizontal or vertical line exactly in the centre of the frame while keeping the camera at a perfect 90 degree angle to the scene. By doing so, the fisheye distortion is minimized or eliminated. For the example below, I used the Tokina 10-17mm ZOOM Fisheye at 10mm, which covers a full 180 degree field of view. Not only is he horizon perfect...look

what the lens does to the sky!


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However, when the lens is tilted away, up or down, from the 90 degree position, you get a completely different (fisheye type) image...see below.






























However, a full-frame fisheye can also be used as a super-wide angle lens if a certain technique is followed: keeping a horizon line or a horizontal or vertical line exactly in the centre of the frame while keeping the camera at a perfect 90 degree angle to the scene. By doing so, the fisheye distortion is minimized or eliminated. For the example below, I used the Tokina 10-17mm ZOOM Fisheye at 10mm, which covers a full 180 degree field of view. Not only is he horizon perfect...look

what the lens does to the sky!















However, when the lens is tilted away, up or down, from the 90 degree position, you get a completely different (fisheye type) image...see below.















The bottom line - a fisheye, such as the Tokina 10-17 Zoom Fisheye, is a creative tool and not a special effect accessory when used in a creative way.
















However, a full-frame fisheye can also be used as a super-wide angle lens if a certain technique is followed: keeping a horizon line or a horizontal or vertical line exactly in the centre of the frame while keeping the camera at a perfect 90 degree angle to the scene. By doing so, the fisheye distortion is minimized or eliminated. For the example below, I used the Tokina 10-17mm ZOOM Fisheye at 10mm, which covers a full 180 degree field of view. Not only is he horizon perfect...look

what the lens does to the sky!















However, when the lens is tilted away, up or down, from the 90 degree position, you get a completely different (fisheye type) image...see below.















The bottom line - a fisheye, such as the Tokina 10-17 Zoom Fisheye, is a creative tool and not a special effect accessory when used in a creative way.





© Larry Frank Photographics ~ a Sandvox site